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Archive for Release

The Important Things in Life

Forget to remember and remember to forget what isn’t important to you.

—Kathy Walter

Duff photoDuff here. Sometimes, I get wound up in one Important Way of Doing Something. Like: this is the only way to go on this path in the forest. Or this is the only way to get an extra treat. Perhaps this is the only way to let Mom know I need to go Outside. (Now, that’s critical.) And yet, I ponder: what is Really Important? Is Everything of Equal Value? In the Larger Scheme of things, does it really matter how I get an Extra Morsel? If I’m cemented in one Habit, will it matter 100 years from now? As long as I achieve my goal, I can live unstuck.

This concept really hit home the other day as Mom and I were walking through the forest. I took us on a Path that made sense to me: clear, smooth and direct. We got to our Destination and turned back to head to the car. Even though (because of my Innate Sense of Smell), I have the Superior Ability to track us home, Mom decided to Change Things Up. (Remind me to tell you about the time when Mom got lost, and I led her back to the Car. But that’s a story for a Different Time.) We went a different route, even though I kept attempting to move her back to the original Path. Eventually, I gave up and dejectedly followed her. Imagine my amazement when we arrived at the original Starting Post? I was ecstatic. I lived unstuck.

Are you like Me? Get Stuck in a Rut and think that’s the only Way to do Things? A Famous Family therapist once said there were 147 different ways to wash the dishes. And they all met the Objective: to clean the dinnerware. I found that Concept boggling. Talk about living unstuck. I recommend: Try something new. A new way to work. A new food. (Yum.) The Important Things in life demand a variety of experiences. Release the rest of it. Live unstuck. #unstuckliving#importanceofthingsinlife

Doing Some Spring Cleaning?

Spring is here. Buds have formed and are beginning to unfold. The peach trees, the daffodils and other small bushes have unfurled their colors. The sun rises earlier and earlier to bring those longer and warmer days. Birds have returned and are splashing around in the pond. Others chirp sleepily in the trees as I take my early morning walk with MacDuff. The sun is shining, but not overbearing. The mornings are still brisk, with a crisp edge to the breeze. The promise of a warmer tomorrow is already there.

As spring moves in, the forsythia with its branches with bright yellow star-like blossoms wave in the breeze. The tiny pink buds of the flowering plum and the white blossoms of the apple and pear trees are all showing their colors. The sun shines through the greening branches, making it hard to concentrate on anything indoors. I yearn to be outside.

Springtime inspires me to clean and declutter my home and yard. Those dust bunnies and cobwebs that have gathered over the winter months are exposed. It’s also a good time to clean out my thoughts and feelings. When I do a mental spring-clean, my life is easier. With ongoing rebirth going on around me in nature, I find it hard not to weed out the old that is no longer useful in my mind, the parts that are keeping me stuck.

At a slow start for the season? Don’t miss out. Here are a few ideas to help you find your way:

  • Get outdoors. Take a walk, begin to clean up the yard or go for a bike ride. Have a picnic, either on the porch or a few miles away after hiking in from the trailhead. Let the soft, bright sunshine lift any heavy, dark thoughts and feel them drift away.
  • Cultivate quiet time. Set some time aside and take a mental inventory. Check out what has been cluttering your heart and mind. Take a planned break from technology and your “electronic leash.” Spend some time to visualize how you want to feel in your life and your friendships. Then take a move to fulfill those dreams.
  • Develop a new skill or learn a new hobby. Perhaps your mind has grown stale over the winter. But how to expand your horizons? Go back in time: always wanted to learn to develop a skill? Weld? Shoot? Or play a harmonica? Go for it. What was your favorite hobby as a child? Pick it up again. It’s spring, the time of renewal. The creative abilities of your mind are endless.
  • Learn to “row your boat more gently down the stream.” At times life seems to come all at once, bringing a compelling need to take care of business right away. But we can move at our individual pace for it will all get done in due time. Make life easier and enjoy more both within and around you.
  • Think more optimistically. Want to boost your immune system? Be happier in general? Look at the bright side of life and find that silver lining in life. Weed out “always” and “never” from what you’re saying; you’ll find the world to be a better place.

I’m curious: what are you doing to welcome spring? How are you spring cleaning, either inside yourself or outside in your home or garden? I’d love to hear. Enter your comments below.

Letting Go

For me this year, autumn, with all its glory, came early. The bright sunshine of summer whisked by and the cooler mornings of fall entered the scene. The first hard frost brought the end of the small, colorful summer flowers. Leaves are falling and piling on the ground. Time to let go and move into a new season.

And with this change comes those particular feelings that fall brings and a reminder of the snow and colder weather to follow. Just what are these “fall feelings”? I want to share a few of the many “feelings” that fill my heart and memory banks during this season.

  • The bright beauty of changing leaves. Bright flashes of red and yellow heralded the season.The first hint of fall’s arrival that made my heart sing was the bright red color of the trees lining White Mountain Road. This festive color began to show at the very tops of the trees, then like slowly dripping paint, started to drop through the rest of the branches. As the days grew shorter, the leaves seemed to change more and more quickly until they were completely scarlet. The willowy aspens, with their lovely yellows and gold of fall apparel, brought a dancing movement to the scene as the wind rippled through the groves on the mountains. Strong winds quickly whisked that fall apparel into the horizon last week, leaving patchy, bare branches.
  • The soft fall of pine needles. As the winds picked up and got more brisk, a carpet of gold and brown pine needles scattered all over the Mountain. As I looked up into the Ponderosas, I saw where the older needles had already turned color, ready for their flight to the ground. There will be time to rake them up in the spring, but for now, they are a reminder of the cycle of shedding and regrowth. The oak trees also showed off their bronze leaves, and they cushion my boots as I hike along my favorite trail. It’s as if all outdoors was getting ready for the changes to come.
  • The scents and sounds of autumn. For me, there is a crisp quality to the air, a dryness to it. The pungent smoke from chimneys and campfires is a reminder of comfort and warmth after being outside, bringing with it the memory of friendships and the cozy sensation of autumn. As the leaves lost their moisture, there was a different sound, a gentle rustle when a gusty wind skipped them along the forest floor. The insistent honking of the flocks of migrating birds was a sure sign of cooler weather on the way.

This is also the time for me to do some “fall house cleaning.” I tend to cocoon in the winter, and it’s helpful to have a semi-clean slate to work from. On a physical level, I take a look at what’s around me, and sort through what I want to keep and what needs to go. If something doesn’t make me feel good, I will find another home for it and gift it along its way. On a mental level, I pay attention to my thoughts. Time to weed the mental garden of pesky negative thoughts and smoldering regrets. Next is the emotional level. This is the time of year for happiness and gratitude. Thanksgiving is coming soon. I can do my part to be grateful for all things large and small in my world. Sometimes I’m more successful than others, but I’m preparing for a bountiful harvest of positives.

Autumn is an opportunity for me to use all of my senses to savor the season: physically, mentally and emotionally. As I remember the magic of warmth with layers of zip up hoodies and lighter weight jackets, I welcome the changing season. You too? Autumn, here we come!

I’m curious: what are your feelings about the fall season? What are you ready to release? I’d love to hear from you. Leave a comment below

I hope I have opened the door to enjoying the little things, both here on the Mountain and in your life.

Bringing over 30 years of experience to her practice, Joan is a highly qualified NLP practitioner and hypnotherapist. She specializes in anxiety, panic attacks, fears, and phobias, using her knowledge to help her clients become no-limit people. Many have found her friendly ways and precise techniques to be the easiest road toward a better life.